Amman, Capital Of Jordan And The Citadel

Amman Citadel

Amman Citadel

Amman, capital of Jordan, is a fascinating city full of contrasts offering a unique blend of old and new, ideally situated on a hilly area between the desert and the fertile Jordan Valley. In the commercial heart of the city, ultra modern buildings, hotels, restaurants, art galleries and boutiques rub shoulders comfortably with traditional coffee shops and artisans. The capital of Jordan in the Bible under the name of Rabbah of the Ammonites in the history of Og king of the Ammonites, who was reputed to be a giant, whose huge bed was kept, in fact, Rabbah of the Ammonites. The city was also known as Philadelphia, a name that was assigned in Ill. governor century BC Ptolemy Philadelphus. Everywhere there are traces of the past and history. Because of its prosperity and thanks to the temperate climate, almost half of Jordan’s population is concentrated in the area of Amman.

The residential suburbs consist of mainly tree-lined streets and boulevards dotted with elegant white houses. The center is older and more traditional-looking, with small businesses that produce and sell all kinds of objects, from jewelery specializing in gold and silver to the most common household appliances. The city offers its visitors a lively nightlife, with events and cultural performances, folk dances, modern restaurants and clubs. The people of Amman is a cosmopolitan, well educated and extremely hospitable. Welcomes its guests and is proud to SHOW them the wonders of this fascinating and vibrant city. In just four hours drive you can reach anywhere in the country so that Amman is the perfect starting point for exploring the Jordan.

What to see in Amman?. The Citadel is ideal to begin a visit to the archaeological sites of the city. Built on the ancient Rabbath-Ammon, excavations have uncovered many Roman remains, Byzantine and early Islamic period. Situated on a rock, it offers visitors a wonderful view of the incredible history of the city, but also breathtaking views of the whole region. The places of interest in the Citadel are:

The Umayyad Palace complex, 720-750 AD The grand monumental entrance in the shape of a cross with its four niches in turn leads to a courtyard and a colonnaded street beside which stand the ruins of the ancient buildings of the complex.

The Temple of Hercules, built during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD).
The Byzantine Church, dating roughly between the VI and VII AD Some Corinthian columns allow you to locate the site.

The restored Roman theater, the second century AD, is set against three sides of the hillside and has a capacity of 6,000 spectators. It is still used pearls representations.

The Roman Forum. Public square, flanked by the theater and the Odeon, the largest of the Empire (100 x 50 meters). The row of columns at the entrance of the theater is what remains of the colonnade that once flanked.

The Nymphaeum. In Roman cities were always public fountains and ornamental gardens. The main fountain is located near the theater and dates to the late second century AD

The Great Mosque Husseini. After a short walk, you can admire the decorations in pink and white stone of the building desired by the Emir Abdullah in 1924 at the point on which stood a more ancient period of the Umayyad Mosque. In 1987, the late King Hussein oversaw its restoration.

Kan Zaman is situated on a hill 12 km south of the city. It is a renovated complex of stables, warehouses and residential homes has now become one of the main tourist attractions. Kan Zaman, which means “once upon a time”, combines a turn of the century with the best food and crafts of Jordan . The paved courtyard overlooking artisan shops, jewelers and spices. Visitors can smoke a nargileh in coffee or enjoy the traditional Arab food in the restaurant. And there are unusual entertainment.

Originally posted 2012-07-25 13:53:56.

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